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Your Guide To Festival Essentials As Central Virginia families plan for the upcoming Labor Day weekend, there are a lot of possibilities. For hundreds of local families, this will be a somber holiday weekend. Taking Woodstock: Rated R for graphic nudity, some sexual content, drug use and language. 120 mins. A comedy based on the real-life story of Elliot Tiber (Demetri Martin), whose family was involved in making the Woodstock Music and Arts Festival happen. The bank is about to foreclose on the family motel and Elliot moves back home to help his parents. When he learns the permit for the festival wristbands in a neighboring town has been cancelled, he contacts the producers and tries to drum up some business for the motel. Three weeks later half a million people are on their way to his neighbor"s farm and his life will be forever changed. It is common for hosts to choose a theme based upon the time of year such as children"s clothing for back-to-school and toys for Christmas, or upon the needs of their family. Since the point of the party is to keep costs down, it is important to not go crazy with refreshments or decorations. When having a Swap Party, it is acceptable to do potluck if you want food at it. For some, it is more of a "get in and get out" event wristbands where items are put out for the taking, and as choices are made, people leave with their "new" items. There is a special "Holiday Wishes" fireworks show and our family favorite "Mickey"s Once Upon a Christmastime" parade, which are both spectacular. The only time you will be able to see these shows are during the Christmas Party and between the extremely busy and extremely expensive Christmas week. That week between Christmas and New Years is the busiest of the year for the Magic Kingdom, and often closes due to capacity not long after opening in the morning! AB: We had written three or four songs, and we decided - let"s not repeat ourselves. Let"s stop if it starts sounding like anything we"ve done. On the fourth song, there"s a line [talks about the canyon/fire] -that"s a San Fernando Valley reference; that"s where we"re from. There"s really no bands coming out of the Valley, so this was kind of like our love letter to the Valley. I think the record feels like where we"re from. It reflects who we are as musicians, not looking back, but looking forward. KEN STRINGFELLOW: I would have it sell a bajillion copies, like, tomorrow. I know it"s a great album, but I also know we"ll have to work hard to convince people it"s something to listen to. We"re not the latest, shiniest flavor. But we"re sport wristbands the tastiest. This I know! After numerous years of member changes and stylistic growth, The Posies are back to a basic success formula of creating damn good tunes. Frontmen and founders Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow"s took the time to do a Q & A while on the road in SPAIN to discuss their new release Blood/Candy... Wherever your Labor Day weekend plans take you, be careful on the road. Holiday traffic will be heavy and there"s construction around town and across the state.

GUANGZHOU -- After giving birth to her second child three years ago, 37-year-old Liu Si"en quit her job and became a full-time mom.

Yet life around children is not easy. "Everything I do is for the kids. It"s even more tiring than work," she said.

Liu gave up work, thinking she could offer her children the best education and companionship, as some mothers choose to do in China.

Living in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, Liu follows more than 30 childcare and education WeChat accounts and has joined eight "mothers" groups" on social media. Every day, her phone buzzes with messages sharing thoughts and articles on child-rearing skills and philosophies.

"What about sex education?" "How do I teach the kids to use the toilet?" "How can I make my two kids get along better?" Liu not only reads the articles herself, but also forwards them to her husband.

One of the accounts Liu follows is written by Zhu Yuzi. Zhu, a radio host in Guangdong, is also the mother of two children. She has more than 70,000 followers on WeChat.

Along with several volunteer organizations and the women"s federation of Guangzhou, Zhu compiled a report on the "anxiety index" of Chinese mothers, polling over 4,000 mothers, 70 percent of whom had two children.

The report showed 75 percent said they were "in controllable anxiety," 25 percent were "stressed," while 6 percent were "extremely anxious."

After more than 30 years of the one-child policy, China began to allow all couples to have two children in 2016. While some are happily expecting a new family member, others are reluctant.

A report from the All-China Women"s Federation in 2017 showed over half of families with one child had no desire to raise a second child.

Limited educational and medical resources and quality of baby products were among the top concerns for having another child, while 70 percent of the parents were worried about their financial condition and lack of care for the two children, the report showed.

The findings match what Zhu has found in her survey.

Taking herself for example, Zhu found that one-third of her family expenses were on education. In addition to schooling, her six-year-old son takes six extra-curricular classes that cost up to 30,000 yuan (4,750 U.S. dollars) a year. Her daughter, though just 3 years old, also attends a class after kindergarten. The one-hour course costs 10,000 yuan every year.

"This is what I get for my anxiety: the feeling that my kids have not lost at the starting line," Zhu said.

For working mother Qin Haihong, raising two children while working is stressful and lowers her living quality.

The two often fall sick at the same time. Her husband is busy, their parents are in poor health and she is often left alone with the children.

"All my time is divided into little pieces with so many headaches in life. There is no way I can stay calm," Qin said.

Even grandparents, who often help take care of children in China, are affected.

Ms. Wang, 62, took care of her grandson for three years but last year, she quit the "job" as she was sick of the explosion of messages in the school"s WeChat group.

"The homework is posted in the group along with countless school updates every day. It was like the whole family were going to school with the child," she complained.

"Financial conditions, welfare, social life and employment can all affect the desire to have children," said Dong Yuzheng, head of the Guangdong Academy of Population Development.

China saw 17.2 million live births in 2017, down from 17.9 million in 2016, with birth rate dropping from 1,295 to 1,243 per 100,000 population, according to the National Bureau of Statistics.

"The birth rate is dropping while society is aging. Such demographics sound an alarm for social development. We need to do more to encourage people to have children," Dong added.

The Chinese government is taking measures to increase people"s sense of gains and address the anxiety of parents.

China will increase support for preschool education and intensify supervision on child-care institutes, according to the report delivered by Premier Li Keqiang Monday at the first session of the 13th National People"s Congress, China"s top legislature.

Li said China will develop fair, high-quality education by promoting the integrated development of urban and rural compulsory education and addressing the problem of heavy extracurricular burdens on primary and secondary school students.

The government also intends to raise the personal income tax threshold and create expense deductions for items like children"s education and treatment for serious diseases, the premier said.

Increasing the number of kindergartens has also been listed as a key task for 2018 in the work reports of many local governments.

Social organizations are also coming to the aid of mothers.

A volunteer group in Guangzhou "Love of breast milk" has become a haven for anxious mothers. The group meets regularly to share experiences and holds picnics and other activities to get stay-at-home moms out of their closed world, and encourages them to donate surplus breast milk.

As of November last year, about 1,000 members had donated 1,300 liters of milk, benefiting 378 infants with illnesses.

"It"s a way for us to warm each other. We know we are not alone," said Xu Liang, head of the group. "We find friendship and gratitude here. It"s a virtuous circle."

The group also helps the women"s federation in Guangzhou set up public baby care rooms across the city. Mothers can locate rooms on their mobile phones.

Despite the foreseeable pressure, Xie Ping still wants a second child.

"Thinking of the joy and hope the kids bring us, I believe the difficulties are just temporary," Xie said.